CfP Special issue on Archaeological Digital Scholarship at Journal of CAA

This prospective JCAA special issue aims to facilitate discussion on the theoretical and philosophical aspects of digital scholarship in archaeology as well as the implications of the use of digital technologies and computational methods across the extent of the archaeological knowledge chain: from discovery, through observation, explanation, and dissemination. How are research, synthesis, practice, and teaching within archaeology mediated and transformed by digital approaches?

Brief abstract of Special Collection aim and Content:
Archaeological scholarship crosses the broad range of disciplinary and professional boundaries within and beyond the field itself, but there has been no sustained attempt to examine the nature of this scholarship within the context of the digital in which we increasingly operate. What do we mean by digital scholarship? What is the character and value of scholarship within a digitally mediated archaeology? How do we learn and practice digital scholarship? How do particular digital technologies facilitate, enhance and change the nature of archaeological scholarship?

In 1991 Ernest Boyer argued for the need for a more inclusive view of what it meant to be a scholar, and identified four specific dimensions of scholarship: knowledge acquired through research, through synthesis, through practice, and through teaching, otherwise described as the scholarship of discovery, the scholarship of integration, the scholarship of application, and the scholarship of teaching.

The prospective JCAA special journal issue aims to facilitate discussion on the theoretical and philosophical aspects of digital scholarship in archaeology as well as the implications of the use of digital technologies and computational methods across the extent of the archaeological knowledge chain: from discovery, through observation, explanation, and dissemination. How are research, synthesis, practice, and teaching within archaeology mediated and transformed by digital approaches?

We seek contributions that discuss the implications of digital scholarship for:

  • Archaeological fieldwork (excavation, survey, prospection)
  • Archaeological archives and collections
  • Archaeological research and interpretation
  • Teaching and learning in archaeology
  • The archaeological profession (in academia, industry and commercial sector)
  • Public communication of archaeological knowledge

Paper selection and submission:
Potential contributors will submit abstracts of 500 words by June 15th 2018 to Jeremy Huggett (Jeremy.Huggett@glasgow.ac.uk) and Eleftheria Paliou (e.paliou@uni-koeln.de). The submitted abstracts will be reviewed by the editorial team and a selection of abstracts will be made that ensures content relevance and consistency. The authors of selected abstracts will be contacted to submit full manuscripts. Full manuscripts are expected to be completed and submitted for review at the JCAA by December 31st 2018. The submission and review of full manuscripts will follow the guidelines of the JCAA.

This special issue is part of ongoing discussions in the Working Group 4 of the COST-Action ARKWORK: Archaeological Practices and Knowledge Work in the Digital Environment: https://www.arkwork.eu/ and edited by Eleftheria Paliou, Costas Papadopoulos, Jeremy Huggett, Isto Huvilla.

The Article Publication Charges (APC) will be covered by the COST-Action ARKWORK.

Working Group 4 also intends to hold a funded workshop for contributors in September/October 2018 subject to agreement of the Management Committee of the COST-Action. The workshop will aim at refining the issues brought out in the accepted papers and stimulating discussion among authors.

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