Archaeological perspectives in information science

Date: 
Friday, October 27, 2017 - 08:00 to Thursday, November 2, 2017 - 19:00

A panel at the 2017 ASIS&T Annual Meeting in Crystal City, Virginia together with Michael Olsson (UT Sydney), Ixchel M. Faniel (OCLC Research), Marija Dalbello (Rutgers) and Costis Dallas (University of  Toronto).

Abstract

Archaeology is a domain that has intersections with information science and technology research both as an empirical domain of investigation and as a perspective to inquire into how people interact with information. The aim of this panel is to highlight this interdisciplinary nexus of diverse engagements and to explicate how archaeology has informed and could inform information science research and practice in the future, and how empirical information science research on archaeological practices has enhanced our understanding of both archaeological work and human information behavior and practices in general. 

Archaeology and Archaeological Information in the Digital Society shows how the digitization of archaeological information, tools and workflows, and their interplay with both old and new non-digital practices throughout the archaeological information process, affect the outcomes of archaeological work, and in the end, our general understanding of the human past.

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Taking Health Information Behaviour into Account: implications of a neglected element for success- ful implementation of consumer health technologies on older adults (HIBA) is an Academy of Finland funded research project at Åbo Akademi University.

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Sheds new light on the potential of extra-academic knowledge-making as a contribution in formations of knowledge throughout society, explores extra-academic knowledge as a useful resource in academy, policy development, evidence based practices, and innovation, and focuses on the informational dimensions, stemming from and grounded in an informationscience perspective, which provides the means to address practical information-related issues throughout knowledge-making processes.

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