Archaeological information in the digital society (ARKDIS)

Digitisation of archaeological information and cultural heritage assets has been one of the cornerstones of the digital society debate. However, at the same time when nations have made considerable investments in the digitalisation of archaeological heritage, we know very little about its implications to the usability of archaeological information for different stakeholder groups from citizens to researchers, museum professionals, landowners and property developers. We know a lot about technical challenges, but very little on how information practices influence the usability of information.

The aim of the project is to 1) map the implications and opportunities of the digitalisation of information and information work in the domain of archaeology and material cultural heritage throughout the lifespan of archaeological information from the field to museums and community planning, and 3) to develop and evaluate conceptual and practical methods and procedures for enhancing archaeological information work in the digitalised environment. The project addresses a series of significant recognised challenges within archaeology and, because of the broad societal implications of archaeological information from cultural heritage, museums and media industry to community planning (the legal requirements to protect archaeological sites and its consequences to infrastructure development and land us such as construction of houses, roads and railways), in the digitalised society as a whole.

The project is financed by the Swedish Research Council Grant (340-2012-5751) in 2013-2016/7.

Read more about the project at http://www.abm.uu.se/research/Ongoing+Research+Projects/ARKDIS/ and at ARKDIS blog athttp://arkdis-project.blogspot.com

 

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